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The COVID-19 pandemic was a significant environmental shift that may have triggered undesirable behaviors in people who may or may not have had a genetic predisposition to a disease.
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New study evaluates progressive treatment for mental illness

The physical toll that COVID-19 took (and continues to take) on many people's bodies is painfully obvious. The mental effects of the pandemic shouldn't be overlooked, either. Mental health can be affected by even the slightest changes in a person's life, so you can imagine how a worldwide emergency could affect someone's mind.

In June 2020, months after the pandemic began, 40% of Americans reported problems with their mental health, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Psychology experts agree that mental illness is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. This means that someone may inherit the genes related to a mental illness or personality trait from their parents, but certain external factors can cause that illness to manifest or put the person at greater risk of developing an illness.

The COVID-19 pandemic was a significant environmental shift that may have triggered undesirable behaviors in people who may or may not have had a genetic predisposition to a disease. These struggles included feelings of anxiety and depression, suicidal thoughts, increased substance abuse, and other stress-related disorders.

Even if the pandemic didn't lead to symptoms of mental illness, it certainly showed that it could cause stress. When people feel stressed, they may lash out in anger, struggle to concentrate, change their eating habits, sleep less, or experience physical pain from headaches or stomach aches. Severe stress and a lack of compensation or resolution can lead to feelings of burnout, which many people on the frontlines of the pandemic experienced.

Cybin focuses their time and research on developing progressive methods for treating mental illness. Where traditional drugs fall short is where Cybin picks up the slack. In that spirit, Cybin is conducting a clinical trial on the efficacy of using psychedelic medicine to address the symptoms of mental illnesses, such as major depressive disorder, alcohol use disorder, anxiety disorders, and therapy-resistant psychiatric disorders. The study is particularly targeted toward people who work in the medical field or other essential industries.

Many pharmaceutical studies report their findings based on results from surveys or other qualitative data. While this data isn't necessarily unreliable, it also is not based on numbers. Cybin has found a way to quantify their results in this study by measuring brain activity in patients who are undergoing the proposed treatment. This could add another layer of analysis to the efficacy of the treatment in the future.

Cybin has succeeded in revolutionizing the pharmaceutical industry before, working on the development of widely used medications such as Allegra, Sabril, Anzemet, and Vaniqa. To learn more about their newest study being conducted in Seattle, click here. You can also learn more about Cybin's ventures in the medical field by visiting their website.

This article was written for informational purposes only. It is not meant to provide any type of medical diagnosis or suggest the use of certain drugs is the solution for mental illness. Some of the claims in this article are still being researched and therefore should be discussed with your doctor first.

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