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Rondeau's Reviews: 'Christopher Robin'

This weekend marks the opening of the new, highly-anticipated film "Christopher Robin", the live action version of the Classic "Winnie the Pooh" series.

This time the title character is all grown up and reunited with his childhood friends.

But is this a welcome return to the Hundred Acre Wood?

Let's get one thing straight right off the top - I detest cheap sentiment. I really do.

So it is a relief to tell you that there's nothing cheap or false about the lump-in-the-throat emotions you'll feel watching Disney's delightful "Christopher Robin".

The live action story takes place in post-war London where a now grown-up Christopher Robin is married with a young daughter, but saddled with a job and responsibilities that have all but eviscerated his wide-eyed inner child.

But when Christopher hits rock bottom, it's his old childhood friend - Pooh, Tigger, Piglet and company - who unexpectedly come to the rescue.

Ewan MacGregor does a masterfully understated performance as the title character of the film, while the charming Bronte Carmichael plays his daughter Madeline.

There's so many ways Christopher Robin could have gone wrong, but it gets almost everything right.

It's innocent, but not naive.

Sweet but not saccharine.

And the message is simple, but also deeply cathartic.

There's no profanity, do double entendres, no jokes just for the adults, no explosions.

"Christopher Robin" is a tribute to the innocence of childhood, to the wisdom of doing nothing, and the virtue of simplicity.

And most of all, it's a plaintive reminder to just how enjoyable a day in the Hundred Acre Wood with old friends can be.

I didn't want it to end.

I give "Christopher Robin" four out of five hunny pots.

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